Majority of teens no longer make voice calls

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Research found 92 per cent of teenagers don’t use their mobile phones for voice calls despite 98 per cent owning one

The majority of teenagers (92 per cent) no longer use their mobile phones to make traditional phone calls, despite 98 per cent owning one.

This is according to research carried out by business communications company Fuze, between March and November this year. The research was carried out on 2,500, 15-18 year olds in France, Germany, the Netherlands, the Nordics and the UK (500 teens each).

The research was carried out to study the habits of the “App Generation” – young people who were born and raised with the Internet and smartphones highly prevalent.

Teens instead prefer making calls using Voice-over-IP software such as Skype and Viber. Around 57 per cent use mobiles for video calls, 69 per cent expressed a desire for face-to-face interaction, making video calling high in demand amongst teens.

Challenges
Businesses could face challenges when this new generation of teenagers enter the workforce, bringing with them high technology expectations with the potential of ideological clashing, according to Fuze.

Fuze marketing director Tom Pressley said: “As these young people start to enter the workplace many will find themselves faced with antiquated systems that haven’t been updated in years.

“According to our research, one in five young people have never even used a landline phone, yet over 75% of offices will require them to use desk phones. Such discrepancies are only going to get worse unless businesses review their approach to workplace communication.”

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